Related to: 'The Life of Poo: Or why you should think twice about shaking hands (especially with men)'

By Terence Conran

Plain Simple Useful

Terence Conran has always believed that objects – and surroundings – that are plain, simple and useful are the key to easy living. Here are three projects to get you started on creating a contemporary living space.

Cassell

Cracking the Elements

Rebecca Mileham
Authors:
Rebecca Mileham

From the earliest-known elements to those named in 2016, this book takes a comprehensive look at the development of the periodic table - and reveals untold stories, unsung pioneers and plenty of fascinating science along the way. In twelve illustrated chapters, the book makes sense of the patterns and groups within the periodic table, introducing each of the 118 known elements individually and exploring questions including:- Why did the history of fizzy water give early chemistry a sparkle?- How did hydrogen reveal the structure of the atom?- What was the Bunsen burner's role in discovering new elements?- Which of the alkaline earth metals accounts for a kilogramme of your weight?- Why is Marie Curie such a scientific star?- How do tungsten and vanadium explain the secret of super-sharp Syrian swords?- Who discovered the most elements in the periodic table?- What made nihonium, element 113, such a wonderful new year's gift for Japan?- Is glass a liquid or a solid?- How did nitrogen fulfill the alchemists' dream?- Would you have smeared antimony on your face if you'd lived in ancient Egypt?- Why might naked mole rats have clues for surviving a heart attack?- How did the Haya people of Tanzania make steel 1500 years ago?- What makes xenon a great anaesthetic - and why can't all patients use it?- Might there be a pattern in yet undiscovered elements beyond number 118?

Cassell

Cracking Neuroscience

Jon Turney
Authors:
Jon Turney
Cassell

The Physics Behind...

Russ Swan
Authors:
Russ Swan

Can you really lose weight by consuming nothing but ice cream and beer? How does the latest blockbuster movie get squeezed onto a disk, and how do they make the pictures seem 3D? How much does a selfie weigh? What's the science behind forensic investigations, body scans, and the dating of ancient artefacts?The Physics Behind... takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the scientific principles that that make the modern world work. Could there be life on Mars? Why is north really south? How do self-driving cars find their way around? These and many more topics are explored by starting with the basic science that makes them tick - examining the physics behind them. Packed with detailed original artwork and infographics, The Physics Behind... is perfect for anyone who has ever been curious about the science of life.Including:- The physics behind modern life: Wi-Fi, Facial recognition, touchscreens, microwave ovens, the ice cream and beer diet, taking a selfie, Flash memory, a bag of sugar, catching the train, calendars and clocks- The physics behind entertainment: optical discs, lasers, white water, executive toys, the electric guitar, music, 3D movies- The physics behind analysis: medical imaging, looking at little things, spectroscopy, crime scene investigation, tricorder, microfluidics, radiocarbon dating, proving the Earth is round- The physics behind space: rocket science, space weather, Planet Nine, space telescopes, is there anybody out there? life on Earth, life on Mars- The physics behind big science: what's the matter?, time travel, bomb or meltdown?, the Large Hadron Collider, the Human Genome Project, the Standard Model, gravity, everything- The physics behind the weird universe: strings, rings and other things, N-dimensional space, the hypercube, antimatter, the dark universe, quantum weirdness, quantum biology, time crystals and Majorana- The physics behind the environment: weather forecasts, climate change, renewable energy, migration, peacock feathers, sunburn, rainbows, spider silk- The physics behind transportation: autonomous autos, Hyperloop, Maglev, satellite navigation, motor sport, going rreeaallllyy fast, stealth- The physics behind everything else: curve balls, the Mpemba Effect, why north is really south, perpetual motion and the heat death of the universe, and the physics behind this book.

Cassell

The Secret Life of the Human Body

John Clancy
Authors:
John Clancy
Cassell

Meet Your Bacteria

Catherine Whitlock, Nicola Temple
Authors:
Catherine Whitlock, Nicola Temple

Meet Your Bacteria introduces you to all of your tiny tenants, and reveals the fascinating inner workings of your body, and the importance of these usually helpful (but sometimes harmful) microbes.Highly topical and accessible, this book:- Explores the different bacteria that live on and in various parts of your body (not just in the gut)- Explains what they do, and why some are beneficial and some harmful- Offers practical advice for promoting the good and inhibiting the bad bacteria- Examines the latest thinking on good and bad dirt, and the links between bacteria and diseaseIncluding in-depth profiles on each of the most important families of bacteria living in the human body, and helpful advice on how you can look after your own health through greater knowledge of your microbial friends, this is a wide-ranging introduction to the secret world inside your own body.

Cassell

Science Hacks

Colin Barras
Authors:
Colin Barras

With Science Hacks, you no longer need a PhD to understand the fascinating ideas behind science's greatest theories and discoveries. This latest addition to the ingenious new Hacks series will show you a technique for understanding and, crucially, remembering 100 of the most important and most interesting scientific theories from throughout the ages.On each topic, you'll start with a helicopter overview of the subject, which will give you an introduction to the idea and some context surrounding it. Next, you'll zoom in on the core elements of the theory, with clear explanation of each point to make sure you really understand the concept before finally, you'll be given a one-liner hack to really make the theory stick in your mind.Includes such topics and fields as:Particle PhysicsEvolutionary BiologyGeneticsMedicineChemistryEcology

Cassell

Forgotten Women: The Scientists

Zing Tsjeng
Authors:
Zing Tsjeng

'To say this series is "empowering" doesn't do it justice. Buy a copy for your daughters, sisters, mums, aunts and nieces - just make sure you buy a copy for your sons, brothers, dads, uncles and nephews, too.' - indy100'Here's to no more forgotten women.' Evening StandardThe women who shaped and were erased from our history.The Forgotten Women series will uncover the lost histories of the influential women who have refused over hundreds of years to accept the hand they've been dealt and, as a result, have formed, shaped and changed the course of our futures. The Scientists celebrates 48* unsung scientific heroines whose hugely important, yet broadly unacknowledged or incorrectly attributed, discoveries have transformed our understanding of the scientific world. Mary Anning, the amateur paleontologist whose fossil findings changed scientific thinking about prehistoric life Emmy Noether, dubbed "The Mighty Mathematician You've Never Heard Of"Ynés Mexía, the Mexican-American botanist who discovered over 500 new plant species Wangari Maathai, who started an environmental and ecological revolution in KenyaMargaret Sanger, the maverick nurse who paved the way for the legalization of contraceptionChapters including Earth & Universe; Biology & Natural Sciences; Medicine & Psychology; Physics & Chemistry; Mathematics and Technology & Inventions profile the female scientists who have defied the odds, and the opposition, to change the world around us.*The number of Nobel-prize-winning women.

Cassell

The Element in the Room

Helen Arney, Steve Mould
Authors:
Helen Arney, Steve Mould

'Made me go Hydrogen Argon, Hydrogen Argon, Hydrogen Argon.' Rufus HoundAs featured in Best stocking-filler books of 2017 - The Guardian'Witty and clever writing, every topic is engaging, fun and in some cases laugh-out-loud funny...there are too many highlights to mention' - How it Works Why is it impossible to spin your right foot clockwise while you draw a 6 with your right hand? Can you extract DNA from a strawberry daiquiri? Would you make love like a praying mantis? Should you book a holiday on Earth 2.0? The Element in the Room will take you on a rib-tickling, experiment-fuelled adventure to explain everyday science that is staring you in the face. If you are sci-curious, pi-curious or just the-end-is-nigh-curious then this is the book for you.Steve Mould and Helen Arney are two thirds of science comedy phenomenon Festival of the Spoken Nerd. As a trio they have appeared on QI, created their own experimental* comedy show 'Domestic Science' for Radio 4, toured their stand-up science shows to over 50,000 nerds (and non-nerds) and accumulated millions of views on YouTube.'These nerds are the real deal' - Ben Goldacre, author of BAD SCIENCE 'They make science fun and understandable which is a great combo.' Sandi Toksvig'MIND BLOWN.' Tim Harford'Science was never such hilarious explosive fun.' Richard Herring'This book is 37% better than mine. But it took 100% more nerds to write it.' Matt Parker (the other third of Spoken Nerd)

Kyle Books

101 Brilliant Things For Kids to do With Science

Dawn Isaac
Authors:
Dawn Isaac
Cassell

The Secret Life of Equations

Richard Cochrane
Authors:
Richard Cochrane
Cassell

The Secret Life of the Periodic Table

Dr Ben Still
Authors:
Dr Ben Still

Every element has character, be it volatile, aloof, gregarious or enigmatic. They also have incredible stories of how they came to be, how they were discovered and how their qualities have been harnessed to make everything we have in the world.The Secret Life of the Periodic Table gives a fascinating insight into the discovery and use of all 118 elements. It uncovers incredible stories of how Mendeleev's table was formulated and the individual elements found, as well as explaining the fundamentals of atomic science and each element's place in the table and our universe.

Philip's

Philip's Moon Observer's Guide

Peter Grego
Authors:
Peter Grego
Philip's

Philip's Stargazing With Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson
Authors:
Mark Thompson
Philip's

Philip's The Urban Astronomy Guide

Robin Scagell
Authors:
Robin Scagell
Philip's

Philip's Start Chart 2014

Philip's Star Chart shows the stars and constellations of the night sky in three superb maps: the northern and southern hemispheres, and the equatorial region.All stars visible with the naked eye are shown, with the brightest stars shown in their true colours. Fainter star clusters and nebulae are marked for observers using binoculars or small telescopes. Constellations, double stars and variable stars are also listed, and an informative accompanying text explains how to use the charts throughout the year, at any latitude.In a convenient folded format, Philip's Star Chart is suitable for use in both northern and southern latitudes.

Philip's

Philip's Complete Guide to Stargazing

Robin Scagell
Authors:
Robin Scagell

Catherine Whitlock

Catherine Whitlock is a science writer with a BSc in Biological Science and a PhD in Immunology. She has previously worked in biomedical research in London labs, primarily exploring immune response to autoimmune diseases. This work, combined with teaching roles at Kings College London and NYU London, led her to working as a science communicator, writing about science, medicine and nature. Catherine is based in Kent, England, and she is also the co-author of Meet Your Bacteria

Dr John Murray

Dr John Murray is a lunar expert at the Open University.

Peter Grego

Peter Grego is Director of the Lunar Section of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy (SPA) and the Topographical Coordinator of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) Lunar Section. He writes and illustrates the monthly MoonWatch page in Astronomy Now magazine and is the expert on observing for Sky at Night magazine's Astro Answers.

Robin Scagell

Robin Scagell is a long-serving Vice President of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy. A lifelong stargazer, he has worked as an observer and photographer, and as a journalist has edited a wide range of popular-interest magazines. Robin is the author of several popular astronomy books, and has contributed to many other publications. He has been awarded the Sir Arthur Clarke Award for Space Reporting in recognition of his many appearances on TV and radio talking about astronomy and space.