Related to: 'The Life of Poo: Or why you should think twice about shaking hands (especially with men)'

By Terence Conran

Plain Simple Useful

Terence Conran has always believed that objects – and surroundings – that are plain, simple and useful are the key to easy living. Here are three projects to get you started on creating a contemporary living space.

Cassell

Meet Your Hormones

Cassell

Cracking Neuroscience

Jon Turney
Authors:
Jon Turney

For so long, the brain was the great unknown of human biology; an evolved complex of cells, chemicals and electricity, which eluded even the understanding of its own grey matter. Now, in this comprehensive guide, the most complicated concepts from across the field of neuroscience - such as memory, addiction and mind mapping - are broken down into easily understandable bite-sized pieces, to give everyone the chance to understand their own brain. Includes sections on:-The anatomy of the brain-Neurons, synapses and axons - the building blocks of the brain-Differences in male and female development-Modern treatment of mental illness-The effects on the brain of different food and stimulants-Memory, senses, cravings-Fight or flight-Perception and sensation-The future of neuroscience

Cassell

Cracking the Elements

Rebecca Mileham
Authors:
Rebecca Mileham

From the earliest-known elements to those named in 2016, this book takes a comprehensive look at the development of the periodic table - and reveals untold stories, unsung pioneers and plenty of fascinating science along the way. In twelve illustrated chapters, the book makes sense of the patterns and groups within the periodic table, introducing each of the 118 known elements individually and exploring questions including:- Why did the history of fizzy water give early chemistry a sparkle?- How did hydrogen reveal the structure of the atom?- What was the Bunsen burner's role in discovering new elements?- Which of the alkaline earth metals accounts for a kilogramme of your weight?- Why is Marie Curie such a scientific star?- How do tungsten and vanadium explain the secret of super-sharp Syrian swords?- Who discovered the most elements in the periodic table?- What made nihonium, element 113, such a wonderful new year's gift for Japan?- Is glass a liquid or a solid?- How did nitrogen fulfill the alchemists' dream?- Would you have smeared antimony on your face if you'd lived in ancient Egypt?- Why might naked mole rats have clues for surviving a heart attack?- How did the Haya people of Tanzania make steel 1500 years ago?- What makes xenon a great anaesthetic - and why can't all patients use it?- Might there be a pattern in yet undiscovered elements beyond number 118?

Cassell

Meet Your Bacteria

Catherine Whitlock, Nicola Temple
Authors:
Catherine Whitlock, Nicola Temple
Cassell

Science Hacks

Colin Barras
Authors:
Colin Barras
Cassell

Forgotten Women: The Scientists

Zing Tsjeng
Authors:
Zing Tsjeng
Cassell

The Element in the Room

Helen Arney, Steve Mould
Authors:
Helen Arney, Steve Mould

'They make science fun and understandable which is a great combo.' Sandi Toksvig 'These nerds are the real deal.' Ben Goldacre, author of BAD SCIENCE Why is it impossible to spin your right foot clockwise while you draw a 6 with your right hand? Can you extract DNA from a strawberry daiquiri? Would you make love like a praying mantis? Should you book a holiday on Earth 2.0? The Element in the Room will take you on a rib-tickling, experiment-fuelled adventure to explain everyday science that is staring you in the face. If you are sci-curious, pi-curious or just the-end-is-nigh-curious then this is the book for you.Steve Mould and Helen Arney are two thirds of science comedy phenomenon Festival of the Spoken Nerd. As a trio they have appeared on QI, created their own experimental* comedy show 'Domestic Science' for Radio 4, toured their stand-up science shows to over 50,000 nerds (and non-nerds) and accumulated millions of views on YouTube.'Made me go Hydrogen Argon, Hydrogen Argon, Hydrogen Argon.' Rufus Hound'MIND BLOWN.' Tim Harford'Science was never such hilarious explosive fun.' Richard Herring'This book is 37% better than mine. But it took 100% more nerds to write it.' Matt Parker (the other third of Spoken Nerd)(P) 2017 Octopus Publishing Group

Cassell

The Secret Life of the Periodic Table

Dr Ben Still
Authors:
Dr Ben Still

Every element has character, be it volatile, aloof, gregarious or enigmatic. They also have incredible stories of how they came to be, how they were discovered and how their qualities have been harnessed to make everything we have in the world.The Secret Life of the Periodic Table gives a fascinating insight into the discovery and use of all 118 elements. It uncovers incredible stories of how Mendeleev's table was formulated and the individual elements found, as well as explaining the fundamentals of atomic science and each element's place in the table and our universe.

Cassell

The Secret Life of Equations

Richard Cochrane
Authors:
Richard Cochrane
Philip's

Philip's Moon Observer's Guide

Peter Grego
Authors:
Peter Grego
Philip's

Philip's Stargazing With Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson
Authors:
Mark Thompson
Philip's

Philip's Astrophotography With Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson
Authors:
Mark Thompson
Philip's

Philip's The Urban Astronomy Guide

Robin Scagell
Authors:
Robin Scagell

Philip's The Urban Astronomy Guide provides the ideal introduction to the fascinating hobby of astronomy for the town dweller. These days, you don't have to live close to a city or town centre to suffer from the effects of light pollution. From your back garden or rooftop observing site, your night sky will be illuminated by light from the surrounding city or town. And while, like everyone else, you will have to contend with the vagaries of the weather, you will have the added problem of poor air quality. But despite these difficulties, there is still a host of celestial delights to be seen!In this book, author Robin Scagell shows that night-time lighting and the resultant brightening of the sky can be combated, and demonstrates how to make the best of poor conditions. Although the unaided eye may be able to pick out only a few hundred stars, binoculars or a small telescope will reveal many times that number. A little optical aid can also give you good views of every type of major astronomical object, including star clusters, nebulae and galaxies.For example, for those who want to develop their interest further, there are special filters that let through the light from distant nebulae while blocking out wavelengths infested by unwanted stray light from streetlights. And modern CCDs allow modest amateur telescopes to penetrate the urban sky glow and reveal sights that would have taxed the largest professional instruments only 30 years or so ago.Philip's The Urban Astronomy Guide will show you how to get the most out of almost any sky with whatever equipment you have, or even with none at all.

Philip's

Philip's Start Chart 2014

Philip's Star Chart shows the stars and constellations of the night sky in three superb maps: the northern and southern hemispheres, and the equatorial region.All stars visible with the naked eye are shown, with the brightest stars shown in their true colours. Fainter star clusters and nebulae are marked for observers using binoculars or small telescopes. Constellations, double stars and variable stars are also listed, and an informative accompanying text explains how to use the charts throughout the year, at any latitude.In a convenient folded format, Philip's Star Chart is suitable for use in both northern and southern latitudes.

Philip's

Philip's Complete Guide to Stargazing

Robin Scagell
Authors:
Robin Scagell

Dr John Murray

Dr John Murray is a lunar expert at the Open University.

Heather Couper

Heather Couper is a past President of both the British Astronomical Association and the Society for Popular Astronomy. She is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and the Institute of Physics, and a former Millennium Commissioner, for which she was awarded the CBE in 2007.

Nigel Henbest

Nigel Henbest has been Astronomy Consultant to New Scientist magazine, Editor of the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, and Media Consultant to the Royal Greenwich Observatory. He is also a Future Astronaut with Virgin Galactic.

Peter Grego

Peter Grego is Director of the Lunar Section of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy (SPA) and the Topographical Coordinator of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) Lunar Section. He writes and illustrates the monthly MoonWatch page in Astronomy Now magazine and is the expert on observing for Sky at Night magazine's Astro Answers.

Robin Scagell

Robin Scagell is a long-serving Vice President of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy. A lifelong stargazer, he has worked as an observer and photographer, and as a journalist has edited a wide range of popular-interest magazines. Robin is the author of several popular astronomy books, and has contributed to many other publications. He has been awarded the Sir Arthur Clarke Award for Space Reporting in recognition of his many appearances on TV and radio talking about astronomy and space.