Related to: 'Philip's 2018 Stargazing Month-by-Month Guide to the Night Sky Britain & Ireland'

Philip's

Philip's Essential Guide to Space

Paul Sutherland
Authors:
Paul Sutherland
Philip's

Philip's Month-by-Month Star Finder

John Woodruff, Wil Tirion
Contributors:
John Woodruff, Wil Tirion

Philip's Month-by-Month Star Finder is a concise calendar for star watchers in the northern hemisphere. Star charts show the position of stars, constellations and other celestial objects for each month of the year, in both northerly and southerly directions. The introduction explains the basic facts that observers need to know: the apparent motions of the stars, seasonal changes, star brightnesses, the nature of the Milky Way, and how the night sky is represented on maps.In addition, location tables are provided for the four planets bright enough to be seen easily from the Earth with the naked eye: Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. The principal lunar features are also indicated on a pair of photographs showing the Moon at first quarter and at last quarter.

Philip's

Philip's Month-By-Month Stargazing 2017

Heather Couper, Nigel Henbest
Authors:
Heather Couper, Nigel Henbest
Philip's

Philip's Moon Observer's Guide

Peter Grego
Authors:
Peter Grego
Cassell

The Astronomy Bible

Heather Couper, Nigel Henbest
Authors:
Heather Couper, Nigel Henbest
Cassell

How to Build a Universe: From the Big Bang to the End of the Universe

Ben Gilliland
Authors:
Ben Gilliland

From the first particles of matter and atomic building-blocks to hydrogen fusion, large galaxies and supermassive black holes, with a healthy dose of history and fun facts to glue everything together, this is your very own guide to How to Build a Universe. Using a mixture of eye-catching graphics, humour and structured narrative, in How to Build a Universe, Metro columnist Ben Gilliland explains the complex concepts surrounding the birth and development of the galaxies, without overwhelming or patronising the reader. Gilliland demonstrates how the cosmos came to be - from the formation of the first particles in the Big Bang to the development of the first stars, galaxies, planets and leading up to the present day and where the future of the universe might lie. Each chapter has an ongoing narrative, building the universe piece by piece, with graphics and fact boxes interspersed throughout.

Philip's

Philip's Stargazing With Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson
Authors:
Mark Thompson
Philip's

Philip's Star Chart

Philip's Star Chart shows the stars and constellations of the night sky in three superb maps: the northern and southern hemispheres, and the equatorial region.All stars visible with the naked eye are shown, with the brightest stars shown in their true colours. Fainter star clusters and nebulae are marked for observers using binoculars or small telescopes. Constellations, double stars and variable stars are also listed, and an informative accompanying text explains how to use the charts throughout the year, at any latitude.In a convenient folded format, Philip's Star Chart is suitable for use in both northern and southern latitudes.

Philip's

Philip's Stargazing with Binoculars

Robin Scagell, David Frydman
Authors:
Robin Scagell, David Frydman
Cassell

The Story of Astronomy

Heather Couper, Nigel Henbest
Authors:
Heather Couper, Nigel Henbest
Philip's

Philip's Complete Guide to Stargazing

Robin Scagell
Authors:
Robin Scagell

David Frydman

David Frydman has been a keen observer for many years of all things astronomical and of atmospheric phenomena. In recent years he has observed mainly with binoculars and small telescopes. He has a special interest in optical instruments, having tested and used many hundred binoculars, telescopes and lenses.

Dr John Murray

Dr John Murray is a lunar expert at the Open University.

Heather Couper

Heather Couper is a past President of both the British Astronomical Association and the Society for Popular Astronomy. She is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and the Institute of Physics, and a former Millennium Commissioner, for which she was awarded the CBE in 2007.

Ian Ridpath

Ian Ridpath is a full-time writer, broadcaster and lecturer on astronomy. He is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and a member of the Association of British Science Writers. A former editor of Popular Astronomy, he is a regular contributor to Astronomy Now. Ian Ridpath's many books include Collins Guide to Stars and Planets, Gem Stars and The Monthly Sky Guide. He is also the editor of the highly respected Norton's Star Atlas - a must-have publication for most practical astronomers - and the Oxford Dictionary of Astronomy.

Nigel Henbest

Nigel Henbest has been Astronomy Consultant to New Scientist magazine, Editor of the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, and Media Consultant to the Royal Greenwich Observatory. He is also a Future Astronaut with Virgin Galactic.

Peter Grego

Peter Grego is Director of the Lunar Section of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy (SPA) and the Topographical Coordinator of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) Lunar Section. He writes and illustrates the monthly MoonWatch page in Astronomy Now magazine and is the expert on observing for Sky at Night magazine's Astro Answers.

Robin Scagell

Robin Scagell is a long-serving Vice President of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy. A lifelong stargazer, he has worked as an observer and photographer, and as a journalist has edited a wide range of popular-interest magazines. Robin is the author of several popular astronomy books, and has contributed to many other publications. He has been awarded the Sir Arthur Clarke Award for Space Reporting in recognition of his many appearances on TV and radio talking about astronomy and space.

Sir Patrick Moore

Sir Patrick Moore has been popularizing astronomy for 50 years and has written more than 60 books on the subject. He is the presenter of the world's longest running television series, The Sky At Night, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2007, and has been commemorated with a set of Royal Mail stamps. In 1967 he was awarded the OBE for his services to astronomy, followed in 1988 by the CBE; in 2000 he was awarded a BAFTA, then, in 2001, he received a knighthood and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Wil Tirion

Wil Tirion, who lives in the Netherlands, is the most highly regarded cartographer of celestial maps and charts in the world today.