Related to: 'Science Hacks'

Cassell

Maths Hacks

Richard Cochrane
Authors:
Richard Cochrane

Everything you need to know about 100 key mathematical concepts condensed into easy-to-understand sound bites designed to stick in your memory and give you an instant grasp of the concept.On each topic, you'll start with a helicopter overview of the subject, which will give you an introduction to the idea and some context surrounding it. Next, you'll zoom in on the core elements of the theory, with clear explanation of each point to make sure you really understand the concept, along with simple examples that everyone can follow. Finally, you'll be given a one-liner hack to really make the theory stick in your mind. The perfect introduction to algebra, logic, probability and much more, this is a great new way to learn about the most important mathematical ideas and concepts in a way that makes them easy to recall even months after reading the book.Topics covered include:NumbersAlgebraLogicGeometryProbabilityComputer scienceApplied mathematicsMechanicsStatisticsSet Theory

Cassell

Cracking Quantum Physics

Brian Clegg
Authors:
Brian Clegg

Enter the invisible world of sub-atomic physics and discover the very core of existence. Cracking Quantum Physics takes you through every area of particle physics to clearly explain how our world was, and is, created, and breaks down the most complex theories into easily understandable elements. Subjects covered include:-Time travel-The Higgs field-Dark Matter-The anatomy of the elements-Enter the atom-Quantum reality-Quantum tunnelling-Electrodynamics-Accelerators and colliders-The Zeno effectAn easy-to-understand guide to some of the most complex and intriguing topics: Cracking Quantum Physics is a must-read for anyone who has ever wondered about the underlying forces and materials that make up the world as we know it.

Cassell

Particle Physics Brick by Brick

Dr Ben Still
Authors:
Dr Ben Still
Cassell

The Secret Life of the Periodic Table

Dr Ben Still
Authors:
Dr Ben Still
Cassell

The Secret Life of Equations

Richard Cochrane
Authors:
Richard Cochrane

Discover the 50 equations that have led to incredible discoveries, ground-breaking technology and have shaped our understanding of the world.From much heralded classics, like Zeno's Dichotomy and Pythagoras's Theorem, to The Schrödinger Wave Equation and Google PageRank, each equation is broken down and explained in a unique, illustrated way, so that you understand what it's about; what it's good for; its history, detail and related equations.Behind every important scientific discovery there is an equation. They are far from baffling, and now you too can understand their power and beauty!

Cassell

The Invention of Numbers

Peter Bentley
Authors:
Peter Bentley

Numbers are at the heart of the existence of the universe and everything in it, and yet a lot of us have little understanding of their creation, let alone their part in philosophy, art, music, physics, literature, religion and computing. Dr Bentley's fascinating history of the origins of numbers will unlock the secrets of these things that we take for granted and shows how numbers seem to take on human characteristiscs - as they can be perfect or irrational, amicable or prime, real or imaginary.From zero to infinity, learn about the way numbers have shaped our world, discover amazing facts and enjoy the pure beauty of mathematical logic.

Philip's

Philip's Moon Observer's Guide

Peter Grego
Authors:
Peter Grego

Philip's Moon Observer's Guide is a practical guide for Moonwatchers, suitable for both beginners and more experienced observers. Peter Grego, a well-known Moon expert, shares his enthusiasm and expertise in this informative book.Features on the Moon are best seen when they are close to the day-night line, known as the terminator. At the heart of Philip's Moon Observer's Guide is a day-by-day lunar observing diary based on the progress of the terminator. Using detailed sections of Moon map for each day, the author explains when to look for which features, enabling you to plan your own lunar explorations.Colourful diagrams, stunning close-up images and straightforward text explain the origin and appearance of the different types of surface feature. Eclipses are always eagerly followed by astronomers, and the author explains the best way to observe and record these fascinating events.Philip's Moon Observer's Guide is divided into seven chapters:Lunar geology and the Moon's featuresThe Moon in spaceThe lunar observer's equipmentMoonwatchingRecording your observationsEclipses and occultationsThe space-age MoonPhilip's Moon Observer's Guide also includes a glossary of terms as well as details of a number of astronomical societies and groups, together with useful Internet resources.

Cassell

How to Build a Universe: From the Big Bang to the End of the Universe

Ben Gilliland
Authors:
Ben Gilliland
Philip's

Philip's Stargazing With Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson
Authors:
Mark Thompson
Philip's

Philip's Star Chart

Philip's

Philip's Complete Guide to Stargazing

Robin Scagell
Authors:
Robin Scagell

Philip's Complete Guide to Stargazing is an inspiring introduction to observing the night sky, written by Robin Scagell, author of the Philip's bestseller Stargazing with a Telescope.Scagell first introduces the wonders of the night sky and explains how and why the sky changes during the night and through the seasons. He describes the variety of equipment that can be used - binoculars, telescopes and telescope mounts - with information on what to choose, how to set it up and what to expect to see. There also plenty of tips for those who wish to observe with the naked eye.Next he looks in turn at the Moon, the Solar System, stars and deep sky objects. In each section he describes how to observe your chosen target and what to look for. The text is illustrated with photographs and observational drawings made by talented amateur astronomers, as well as spectacular images returned by spacecraft or taken by large professional telescopes.A month-by-month guide to the constellations is illustrated with maps showing the constellations on view from both northern and southern hemispheres. The author describes the most interesting objects on view each month, with the help of photographs. The guide is applicable to any year.Also included is a complete set of star charts, presenting the whole sky in a series of maps that show stars down to magnitude 5.5 - all stars visible with the naked eye in semi-rural conditions. These maps are drawn with black stars on a white background, so that observers can pencil their own observations on to the charts. Opposite each map is a 'photo-realistic' image which shows how the same portion of the sky appears to the eye.The book finishes with an illustrated and up-to-date A-Z dictionary of astronomy. This covers the stars, planets and galaxies, amateur astronomy and professional observatories, space exploration, famous astronomers, scientific terms, and much more, and is illustrated with photographs, artworks and diagrams. It is an inva

Brian Clegg

Brian Clegg is an award-winning British science writer and public speaker who has written over 20 popular science books and a growing range of novels. He has also written for a wide range of publications such as Nature, BBC History, The Times, the Wall Street Journal and The Observer, and is the editor of www.popularscience.co.uk. Brian lives in a Wiltshire village with his wife and twin children.

Colin Beveridge

Colin Beveridge can't understand why maths isn't the most popular subject on the planet, and spends his life trying to make it so. After a PhD from St Andrews, he worked on NASA's Living With A Star program before returning to the UK in 2008. When he's not writing, teaching, or speaking about maths, he's looking after his young sons or running on south Dorset's excellent cycle path network.

Dr John Murray

Dr John Murray is a lunar expert at the Open University.

Heather Couper

Heather Couper is a past President of both the British Astronomical Association and the Society for Popular Astronomy. She is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and the Institute of Physics, and a former Millennium Commissioner, for which she was awarded the CBE in 2007.

Nigel Henbest

Nigel Henbest has been Astronomy Consultant to New Scientist magazine, Editor of the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, and Media Consultant to the Royal Greenwich Observatory. He is also a Future Astronaut with Virgin Galactic.

Peter Bentley

Dr Peter Bentley is one of the most creative thinkers working in computer science today. He is Senior Research Fellow and College Teacher at the Department of Computer Science, University College London. He is known for his prolific research covering all aspects of Evolutionary Computation and Digital Biology. He is the author of the popular science book Digital Biology (Simon and Schuster USA), and editor of the books Evolutionary Design by Computers, Creative Evolutionary Systems and On Growth, Form and Computers. He is a regular contributor to programming on BBC Radio 4.

Peter Furtado

Peter Furtado has been the editor of History Today magazine since 1998. He holds degrees in History and Art History from Oxford University and has edited many reference works on world history, including the Atlas of World History which was 'wholly admirable...a great achievement' (Daily Telegraph). He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Peter Grego

Peter Grego is Director of the Lunar Section of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy (SPA) and the Topographical Coordinator of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) Lunar Section. He writes and illustrates the monthly MoonWatch page in Astronomy Now magazine and is the expert on observing for Sky at Night magazine's Astro Answers.

Robin Scagell

Robin Scagell is a long-serving Vice President of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy. A lifelong stargazer, he has worked as an observer and photographer, and as a journalist has edited a wide range of popular-interest magazines. Robin is the author of several popular astronomy books, and has contributed to many other publications. He has been awarded the Sir Arthur Clarke Award for Space Reporting in recognition of his many appearances on TV and radio talking about astronomy and space.