Related to: 'On the Edge of Infinity'

Cassell

Primate Change

Vybarr Cregan-Reid
Authors:
Vybarr Cregan-Reid

'An excellent evaluation of our bodily shortcomings' - Financial Times IF YOU THINK YOU ARE YOU, THINK AGAIN.PRIMATE CHANGE is a wide-ranging, polemical look at how and why the human body has changed since humankind first got up on two feet. Spanning the entirety of human history - from primate to transhuman - Vybarr Cregan-Reid's book investigates where we came from, who we are today and how modern technology will change us beyond recognition.In the last two hundred years, humans have made such a tremendous impact on the world that our geological epoch is about to be declared the 'Anthropocene', or the Age of Man. But while we have been busy changing the shape of the world we inhabit, the ways of living that we have been building have, as if under the cover of darkness, been transforming our bodies and altering the expression of our DNA, too.PRIMATE CHANGE beautifully unscrambles the complex architecture of our modern human bodies, built over millions of years and only starting to give up on us now.'Our bodies are in a shock. Modern living is as bracing to the human body as jumping through a hole in the ice. Our bodies do not know what century they were born into and they are defending and deforming themselves in response'

Mitchell Beazley

The Almanac

Lia Leendertz
Authors:
Lia Leendertz
Cassell

Particle Physics Brick by Brick

Dr Ben Still
Authors:
Dr Ben Still
Cassell

The Invention of Numbers

Peter Bentley
Authors:
Peter Bentley
Cassell

How to Build a Universe: From the Big Bang to the End of the Universe

Ben Gilliland
Authors:
Ben Gilliland

From the first particles of matter and atomic building-blocks to hydrogen fusion, large galaxies and supermassive black holes, with a healthy dose of history and fun facts to glue everything together, this is your very own guide to How to Build a Universe. Using a mixture of eye-catching graphics, humour and structured narrative, in How to Build a Universe, Metro columnist Ben Gilliland explains the complex concepts surrounding the birth and development of the galaxies, without overwhelming or patronising the reader. Gilliland demonstrates how the cosmos came to be - from the formation of the first particles in the Big Bang to the development of the first stars, galaxies, planets and leading up to the present day and where the future of the universe might lie. Each chapter has an ongoing narrative, building the universe piece by piece, with graphics and fact boxes interspersed throughout.

Philip's

Philip's Stargazing With Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson
Authors:
Mark Thompson
Cassell

Infographic Guide to Life, the Universe and Everything

Thomas Eaton
Authors:
Thomas Eaton

100 stunning, ingenious and absorbing infographics reveal the secrets of life, the universe and everything!Discover unique, witty and surprising facts about all sorts of natural phenomena, from the secrets of the universe to the wonders of natural science and the impenetrable dimensions of quantum physics. Scientific facts are presented in a memorable, surprising and illuminating way.More than just a book of words, with graphs, Venn diagrams and charts, this book provides a unique overview of surprising and fantastic aspects of life, the universe and everything in 100 unique infographics.Discover:Driving You Crazy - The theory of a major city's traffic flow system explainedIs the Earth in danger? The Torino Scale - Assesses the impact hazard associated with near-Earth objects, such as asteroids and cometsMass Extinction Events - Comparisons according to: When they happened, what caused them, which organisms were affected and what percentage of total species were killed offWhat is a Greenhouse gas? - What makes up the 'greenhouse house' and who's emitting the most - comparison by country and cause of emissionFuture Population Pyramid - How we are ageing via pyramids for each continent

Alexandra Loske

Dr Alexandra Loske is an art historian, editor, and curator at The Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museums.

Brian Clegg

Brian Clegg is an award-winning British science writer and public speaker who has written over 20 popular science books and a growing range of novels. He has also written for a wide range of publications such as Nature, BBC History, The Times, the Wall Street Journal and The Observer, and is the editor of www.popularscience.co.uk. Brian lives in a Wiltshire village with his wife and twin children.

Chas Newkey-Burden

Writer Chas Newkey-Burden is the author of over 30 books including Great Email Disasters and a best-selling biography of Amy Winehouse. His magazine work has included interviewing celebrities like David Beckham and Ricky Gervais.

Heather Couper

Heather Couper is a past President of both the British Astronomical Association and the Society for Popular Astronomy. She is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and the Institute of Physics, and a former Millennium Commissioner, for which she was awarded the CBE in 2007.

Lia Leendertz

Lia Leendertz is an award-winning garden and food writer. She writes a monthly almanac column for the Telegraph, a monthly column for The Garden magazine and a long-running series on growing and eating seasonally for Simple Things magazine. She also contributes frequently to the Guardian and Gardens Illustrated. She is the author of several gardening books and the cookbook Petal, Leaf, Seed: Cooking with the garden's treasures. Lia appears monthly on BB6 Music with Cerys Matthews.Find out more about Lia at www.lialeendertz.com, on Twitter @lialeendertz and on Instagram @lia_leendertz.

Nigel Henbest

Nigel Henbest has been Astronomy Consultant to New Scientist magazine, Editor of the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, and Media Consultant to the Royal Greenwich Observatory. He is also a Future Astronaut with Virgin Galactic.

Peter Bentley

Dr Peter Bentley is one of the most creative thinkers working in computer science today. He is Senior Research Fellow and College Teacher at the Department of Computer Science, University College London. He is known for his prolific research covering all aspects of Evolutionary Computation and Digital Biology. He is the author of the popular science book Digital Biology (Simon and Schuster USA), and editor of the books Evolutionary Design by Computers, Creative Evolutionary Systems and On Growth, Form and Computers. He is a regular contributor to programming on BBC Radio 4.

Peter Grego

Peter Grego is Director of the Lunar Section of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy (SPA) and the Topographical Coordinator of the British Astronomical Association (BAA) Lunar Section. He writes and illustrates the monthly MoonWatch page in Astronomy Now magazine and is the expert on observing for Sky at Night magazine's Astro Answers.

Robert Massey

Robert Massey PhD is an astronomer and Deputy Executive Director at the Royal Astronomical Society.

Robin Scagell

Robin Scagell is a long-serving Vice President of Britain's Society for Popular Astronomy. A lifelong stargazer, he has worked as an observer and photographer, and as a journalist has edited a wide range of popular-interest magazines. Robin is the author of several popular astronomy books, and has contributed to many other publications. He has been awarded the Sir Arthur Clarke Award for Space Reporting in recognition of his many appearances on TV and radio talking about astronomy and space.

Sir Patrick Moore

Sir Patrick Moore has been popularizing astronomy for 50 years and has written more than 60 books on the subject. He is the presenter of the world's longest running television series, The Sky At Night, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2007, and has been commemorated with a set of Royal Mail stamps. In 1967 he was awarded the OBE for his services to astronomy, followed in 1988 by the CBE; in 2000 he was awarded a BAFTA, then, in 2001, he received a knighthood and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Vybarr Cregan-Reid

Vybarr Cregan-Reid is an author and academic. He is Reader in English & Environmental Humanities in the School of English at the University of Kent. His most recent book is Footnotes: How Running Makes us Human (Ebury 2016, paperback June 2017), which reviewers called 'delightful', 'impassioned and energetic', and 'a blazing achievement'. He has written widely on the subjects of literature, health, nature and the environment for the BBC, the Guardian, The Independent, The Big Issue, The Telegraph, The Mail, The Washington Post, The I Newspaper, Wanderlust, Literary Review, New Zealand Herald and he has appeared on Radio 4 and Sky News.

Wil Tirion

Wil Tirion, who lives in the Netherlands, is the most highly regarded cartographer of celestial maps and charts in the world today.